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News from the Award Winning Series JobQuest

"JobQuest" wins second consecutive Emmy

Julie Newman accepts the Emmy(Roanoke, Va.)—Blue Ridge PBS was honored Saturday, June 25, 2011 with a regional Emmy Award.  The station won its second consecutive Emmy for “JobQuest,” recognized again for outstanding community service broadcasting. “JobQuest” also won its second VAB Award for public service. “Positive Parenting” and “HealthQuest” took top VAB honors for news and feature reporting, respectively, while BlueRidgePBS.org won in the web site category. 

The prestigious Emmy for community service is the only award category that recognizes the work of an entire station, rather than an individual. 

“Earning a second Emmy Award is a tremendous achievement for the station, ‘JobQuest’ community partners, Blue Ridge PBS corporate underwriters and our members,” said James Baum, Blue Ridge PBS president and CEO. “The Emmy is the broadcast industry's benchmark for the recognition of television excellence. What makes this award even more gratifying is that we competed against commercial and public television stations in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. Some of these stations have much larger organizations, but Blue Ridge PBS has the community support and dedicated staff it takes to make great, relevant television programs.”

 “JobQuest” community partners were involved in many aspects of the program, which helped people get back to work in the worst economy since the Depression. From promotional activities to prominent on-camera roles during live broadcasts, the following organizations made important contributions to the series: The Roanoke Times, WDBJ7, Virginia Western & New River Community Colleges, Roanoke’s Economic Development Office, Roanoke Regional Office of the Virginia Employment Commission, The Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce; Roanoke Valley Society for Human Resource Management; Virginia Economic Bridge; and National College.

 

Blue Ridge PBS nominated for second consecutive Emmy Award

"JobQuest" series recognized again for outstanding community service

(Roanoke, Va.)—Blue Ridge PBS has been nominated for another regional Emmy Award for "JobQuest," the series that helped get people back to work in the worst economy since the Depression. This is the second consecutive nomination for "JobQuest" in the Emmy’s community service category.

Nominations were announced by representatives from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences during a May 16 ceremony in Washington, D.C. The Emmy is the broadcast industry's benchmark for the recognition of television excellence.

"What sets ‘JobQuest’ apart from other programs is the frequent involvement of so many community partners that invested so much time and energy into the production," said James Baum, Blue Ridge PBS president and CEO. "I’m honored and very proud of our team, including our great community friends."

"JobQuest," which aired monthly from January 2009 through March 2010, was a live, hour-long series that created an interactive, multimedia platform to arm viewers with critical job-search skills and advice. Each episode of "JobQuest" featured 60 quality job openings throughout the region, complemented by up to six "how-to" segments, teaching people how to land a job. Segment examples included how to write a resume and cover letter, how to dress for an interview, how to respond to interview questions and how to fill out an online application. In addition, human resources professionals responded to viewer inquiries throughout the broadcast, by phone and Twitter. "JobQuest" also offered a free a resume review service at viewer request.

The program’s tremendous success was possible thanks to the participation of the following community partners: The Roanoke Times, WDBJ7, Virginia Western & New River Community Colleges, Roanoke’s Economic Development Office, Roanoke Regional Office of the Virginia Employment Commission, The Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce; Roanoke Valley Society for Human Resource Management; Virginia Economic Bridge and National College.

Full episodes of "JobQuest" and many of the program’s "how-to" segments are available online at BlueRidgePBS.org.

Blue Ridge PBS wins Emmy Award for "JobQuest"

Station shares award with volunteers, community partners, members

Blue Ridge PBS has won a regional Emmy Award for "JobQuest," a 15-month long employment advice and information series that helped put people back to work. James Baum, station president and CEO, said he and Blue Ridge PBS staff accept the prestigious award on behalf of all the volunteers, community partners and viewers that made the broadcast a success. The Emmy is the broadcast industry's benchmark for the recognition of television excellence.

Blue Ridge PBS wins Emmy Award for "JobQuest" was chosen as the winner in the community service category, and recognized during a June 5 ceremony in Washington, D.C. Representatives from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS-NCCB) presented the Emmy statuette to Julie Newman, Blue Ridge PBS executive producer and host of "JobQuest."

Sue Ann Staake-Wayne, President of NATAS-NCCB, said there were a record number of nominations this year, and the community service category award is one of the most admired.

"It's a special award, because it is judged by a blue ribbon panel, and given to a station as opposed to an individual," she explained.

Baum said "JobQuest" would not have been possible without the early and substantial involvement of so many dedicated volunteers and community partners, along with the steadfast support of viewers.

"'JobQuest' really was a collaborative, community project." he continued. "Our partners were particularly important. They did not simply lend their names and logos for publicity. All were enthusiastically and integrally involved in each live broadcast. We especially want to recognize The Roanoke Times and WDBJ7 for their special assistance."

WDBJ7 and Blue Ridge PBS share award for "JobQuest"

Virginia Association of Broadcasters recognizes stations for community service

"JobQuest," the popular advice and information program for job seekers, has won the Laurence E. Richardson Community Service Award from the Virginia Association of Broadcasters (VAB).

WDBJ7 and Blue Ridge PBS share award for The award, the third within a week for "JobQuest," was announced Jan. 20 during VAB's annual legislative reception in Richmond, Va. It recognizes WDBJ7 for its contributions to "JobQuest," which airs twice a month on Blue Ridge PBS. The public service program has delivered significant benefits to the community during the past year. WDBJ7 President and General Manager Jeffrey Marks said the station would share the award with Blue Ridge PBS.

"Giving back to the community is something that our radio and television stations do in their individual markets on a regular basis. The Laurence E. Richardson Award is the perfect way for the Association to annually recognize the one outstanding community service program or activity that really touched a particular community," said Doug Easter, VAB Executive Director. "We are thrilled that WDBJ7 and Blue Ridge PBS were able to join together to create and launch 'JobQuest' and that their program was a success for their region."

WDBJ7 and Blue Ridge PBS teamed up with other community partners in late 2008, when the economy took a downturn, to create an interactive program that would help people get back to work. "We were delighted to work with our public television partner to produce this series," said Marks. "In a time when job seekers have needed hope, 'JobQuest' has done a real public service connecting people to work opportunities."

James Baum, Blue Ridge PBS President and CEO, said "JobQuest" would not have been possible without the early and substantial involvement of WDBJ7 and other community partners. "WDBJ7 brought instant credibility and star power to the program," he explained. "They provided two very well recognized news anchors, Jean Jadhon and Keith Humphry, as hosts along with the time and talents of other news staff."

The VAB award trophy is presented in the name of Laurence E. Richardson, a past president of the Virginia Association of Broadcasters, who set an impressive example of community service for all broadcasters. In determining the winner, impartial judges use specific criteria, including supporting documents from local organizations. The judges this year were from the National Association of Broadcasters.

"JobQuest" wins two national awards

JobQuest," has also won two prestigious outreach awards from the National Educational Telecommunications Association (NETA). The awards, which were presented Jan. 14 during NETA's annual conference in Henderson, Nev., recognize "JobQuest" for community impact and effectively coordinating community resources.

"These awards would not have been possible without the enthusiastic participation of many community partners," said James Baum, Blue Ridge PBS President and CEO. "This is truly a statement about what can be accomplished through a collective commitment to public service."

"The bond we all shared was the desire to help the community in some way as the unemployment rates soared in our region," said Molly Bell, marketing manager for The Roanoke Times. "'JobQuest' evolved into an impressive and creative production, with interactive, multimedia resources for job seekers in a large and often under-served portion of Virginia."

Each "JobQuest" episode features 60 job listings from across the region, along with expert insights to shorten the job hunt. After a year of broadcasts and expanding online job hunting resources, "JobQuest" can measure its success in many ways, including some individual success stories.

Celia CarterCelia Carter from Christiansburg, Va. is a certified pharmacy technician, who was unable to find work in her chosen profession. Last year Carter applied for a Virginia Tech job she saw during a "JobQuest" broadcast and, the next day accepted an offer to work for the university's dining services. Before applying, Carter said she called "JobQuest" and talked with a human resources specialist to get more information about the position.

Another "JobQuest" beneficiary is Rebecca Alexander from Roanoke, Va., who participated in the program's free resume review service. After working with a consultant from Virginia Economic Bridge, a "JobQuest" partner, she sent out five of her improved resumes. The very next day she was invited to interview with a potential employer.

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